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Tropical Diver presented by Southwest - The Coral Kingdom

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Georgia Aquarium is home to some of the most amazing and unique animals on the planet. Our Animal Guide is designed to teach you a little more about some of these incredible creatures. Each of our galleries depicts a different environment.

Look through each gallery at animals that you would find in this environment (most of which you will find at the Georgia Aquarium!), and then learn fun and interesting facts about them, from their eating habits to unique personal behaviors. You can even print out full fact sheets for your use.

Bartletts' anthias

Bartletts' anthias

The Barletts’ anthias is a tropical marine species found on coral reefs in the western Pacific Ocean. It is a brightly colored fish most commonly seen during the day swimming above areas of branching coral where it will seek shelter when threatened. View Fact Sheet

Bird wrasse

Bird wrasse

The bird wrasse is an Indo-Pacific species whose range extends from the eastern Indian Ocean to Japan and Hawaii and south to northwest Australia. It has also been reported from Easter Island. View Fact Sheet

Longnose butterflyfish

Longnose butterflyfish

The longnose butterflyfish is widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific region from the Red Sea and East Africa to the Hawaiian Islands and Easter Island. It also occurs in parts of the tropical eastern Pacific. View Fact Sheet

Mandarinfish

Mandarinfish

The mandarinfish is a small, colorful, bottom-living species that lives among the coral in shallow lagoons and inshore reefs in the western Pacific. It usually occurs in small groups spread over a small area. View Fact Sheet

Moon jelly

Moon jelly

The moon jelly can be encountered worldwide in temperate seas, often floating at the surface over reefs and along the shore. This jelly also is commonly seen washed up on beaches. View Fact Sheet

Neon goby

Neon goby

The neon goby is distributed throughout the western central Atlantic from southern Florida and the coast of Texas and Louisiana, to the northern Yucatan peninsula and Belize. Its preferred habitat is coral reefs and rocky substrates at depths of 3 to 168 feet. View Fact Sheet

Pacific sea nettle

Pacific sea nettle

The Pacific sea nettle is common along the coast of California and Oregon and occurs, but is less common, in waters north to the Gulf of Alaska, west to the seas around Japan and south to the Baja Peninsula. The populations of this species are largest during fall and winter. View Fact Sheet

Palette surgeonfish

Palette surgeonfish

The palette surgeonfish is found on tropical reefs in the Indo-Pacific region from East Africa to the central Pacific Ocean. It is relatively uncommon and highly localized in its distribution. View Fact Sheet

Scalefin anthias

Scalefin anthias

The scalefin anthia occurs in the Indo-West Pacific from the Red Sea and East Africa to the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Southwest Japan, Palau and East Australia. This species prefers to swim in lagoons, shallow and outer reefs to depths of 6 to 66 feet. View Fact Sheet

Spotted garden eel

Spotted garden eel

The spotted garden eel inhabits tropical waters in the Indo-Pacific region from Africa to Japan and Australia. It occurs most commonly on protected sandy bottom slopes that are exposed to current. View Fact Sheet

Squarespot anthias

Squarespot anthias

The squarespot anthias is a small marine fish that lives on coral reefs in the western and southwestern Pacific Ocean. It is most frequently found above current-swept drop-offs. The species exhibits a range of brilliant colors including red, orange yellow and purple. View Fact Sheet

Random Facts

  • The yellowbanded sweetlips is native to Indo-Pacific reefs, and in some areas gather in large groups to spawn during the new moon.
  • For seahorses, the male carries eggs and gives birth! Some seahorses can give birth to 1,500 young at once.
  • The squarespot anthias is easily spotted: males have a large magenta square on each side of their bodies, and generally live in "harems" with up to twenty females.
  • A pacific sea nettle's arms can grow to 12 feet (3.7 m) and they are capable of eating other jellies!
  • Giant clams are filter feeders and consume plankton in addition to the food produced by microalgae living in their tissues.

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