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Although it may look similar to the bat star, the vermillion sea star has thinner, plated arms.
  • Size

    7 inches (18 cm)
  • Diet

    Sponges, brachiopods, worms, bryozoans, tunicates and sea pens
  • Range

    Eastern Pacific from Alaska to Baja California
  • Habitat

    Low-tide line and deeper, on rock-bottoms

Physical Characteristics

  • Coloration on top is red-orange, hence name – vermillion sea star.
  • Symmetrical, flat disc shape with five arms (occasionally four or six, though rare). Top of body is covered with small spines.
  • Reaches 7 inches (18 cm) across.

Animal Fact

Coloration on top is red-orange, hence name – vermillion sea star.

Diet / Feeding

  • Diet consists of sponges, brachiopods, worms, bryozoans, tunicates and sea pens.
  • Scavenges dead animals and waste.

Range / Habitat

  • Occurs in the Eastern Pacific from Alaska to Baja California.
  • Found near low-tide line and deeper, on rock-bottoms.

Reproduction & Growth

  • Spawning occurs from March to May.

Conservation Status

  • “Not Evaluated” on the IUCN Red List.

Additional Information

  • Also called “equal sea star.”
  • Thinner, plated arms distinguish this species from the bat star.

Sources

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