The peacock mantis shrimp is named for the resemblance to the terrestrial praying mantis. This flashy shrimp is a bright, rainbow-hued animal. Males are more colorful, while females will usually be more red overall. They have a flattened, segmented body with large blunt appendages held under the head. Peacock mantis shrimp use fast, club-like appendages to strike its prey. This impact is very strong, and can easily stun, kill or break apart prey. Full extension of appendages may take as few as three milliseconds! Their prey mainly consists of crustaceans and mollusks. This beautiful shrimp can be found in coral reefs and sand flats in the Indo-Pacific region.
  • Size

    Up to 7.0 inches (18 cm)
  • Diet

    Diet consists mainly of crustaceans and mollusks
  • Range

    Occurs in Indo-Pacific, south of Japan and north of Australia
  • Habitat

    Found in coral reefs and sand flats in depths up to 130 feet (40 m)

Physical Characteristics

  • Flattened, segmented body with large blunt appendages held under the head.
  • Large, compound eyes capable of complex vision. While human eyes can see through three photoreceptors for light detection- red, blue and green, the mantis shrimp has 12 photoreceptors allowing them to see even more wavelengths of color.
  • Eyes can move independently, and in every direction.
  • Bright, rainbow-hued animal. Males are more flashy, females will usually be more red overall.
  • Adult may grow up to 7.0 inches (18 cm).

Animal Fact

Some peacock mantis shrimp may create monogamous pairs that mate for life.

Diet / Feeding

  • Diurnal, opportunistic feeder.
  • Diet consists mainly of crustaceans and mollusks.
  • Uses fast, club-like appendages to strike its prey. This impact is very strong, and can easily stun, kill or break apart prey. Full extension of appendages may take as few as three milliseconds.

Range / Habitat

  • Occurs in Indo-Pacific, south of Japan and north of Australia.
  • Found in coral reefs and sand flats in depths up to 130 feet (40 m).
  • Dig U-shaped burrows they emerge from when hunting.

Reproduction & Growth

  • An oviparous, or egg-laying, species. Females will carry eggs in their front appendages before hatching to protect them and keep them clean.
  • Some individuals may create monogamous pairs that mate for life.

Conservation Status

  • “Not Evaluated” on the IUCN Red List.

Additional Information

  • More than 350 species of mantis shrimps.
  • Named for the resemblance to the terrestrial praying mantis.

Sources

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