• Size

    1.5 to 3 inches (3.5 - 7 cm)
  • Diet

    Diet consists of beetles, spiders, moths, slugs and caterpillars, as well as other amphibian eggs and occasionally plant matter
  • Range

    Occurs from north Georgia and Alabama, up through the northeastern United States, throughout Canada and into Alaska
  • Habitat

    Found in a wide variety of habitats, including tundra, meadows, forests and wetlands

Physical Characteristics

  • A small brown frog whose primary shade ranges from dark red-brown to pale tan across the back and limbs. A dark stripe starts at the nose and sweeps back along the face, widening into stark panels behind the eyes. The upper lip is bordered in white.
  • The underside of this species is pale white, tending towards yellow under the hind legs.
  • Sizes range from about 1.5 to 3 inches (3.5 – 7 cm). Females are larger than males.

Animal Fact

Wood frogs exhibit a cryogenic freezing strategy to survive the winter. As much as 45% of the frog's body will freeze. Ice forms in its tissues. Its heart and respiration strop. Specialized proteins and glucose prevent this freezing process from causing cell death and as the weather warms, the frog literally thaws out and returns to activity.

Diet / Feeding

  • Diet consists of beetles, spiders, moths, slugs and caterpillars, as well as other amphibian eggs and occasionally plant matter.

Range / Habitat

  • Occurs from north Georgia and Alabama, up through the northeastern United States, throughout Canada and into Alaska.
  • The wood frog is found in a wide variety of habitats, including tundra, meadows, forests and wetlands.
  • Found farther north than any other amphibian or reptile in North America.

Conservation Status

  • “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List.

Additional Information

  • Wood frogs exhibit a cryogenic freezing strategy to survive the winter. As much as 45% of the frog’s body will freeze. Ice forms in its tissues. Its heart and respiration strop. Specialized proteins and glucose prevent this freezing process from causing cell death and as the weather warms, the frog literally thaws out and returns to activity.
  • Adult wood frogs are generally solitary outside of the breeding season.
  • The adults are diurnal (active during the day).
  • Predators that threaten adult wood frogs include snakes, wading birds, raccoons and other small mammals. Tadpoles are preyed upon by large insects, newts and fish.
  • Breeding
    • Wood frogs breed seasonally in the spring, as soon as ice recedes from ponds and pools, usually March-May.
    • Breeding pools must be free of predatory fish to support eggs and tadpoles.
    • Some wood frogs exhibit breeding site fidelity, returning to the same body of water to breed every year.
    • A male will choose a mate by grabbing any other wood frog he sees, and then discerning from body size whether it is a female carrying eggs (larger than himself) or another male (comparable size to himself). Males will release other males and try again with another frog.
    • A single female wood frog can lay 1000-3000 eggs each year.
    • Eggs hatch after 9-30 days, with eggs laid in colder temperatures taking longer to hatch. Tadpoles then metamorphose into frogs at 2 months.

Sources

  • http://animaldiversity.org
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