The pointed-nose stingray can often be caught as by catch from fisheries using bottom trawlers, tangle nets and longline nets. However, T.E.D.s and other exclusion devices have greatly reduced by catch of this species.
  • Size

    41 inches (104 cm)
  • Diet

    Crustaceans and small fish
  • Range

    Indo-Pacific from Southern African to Australia and Papua New Guinea
  • Habitat

    Tropical shallow waters, inshore on sandy substrates

Physical Characteristics

Size

  • Maximum length 41 inches (104 cm).

Body Composition

  • Spade-like shape, predominantly brownish gray with elongated, thorny tail.

Animal Fact

Ovoviparous. Eggs develop inside mother’s body and hatch inside. Animals are then born live.

Diet / Feeding

  • Diet consists of crustaceans and small fish.

Range / Habitat

Range

  • Occurs in the Indo-Pacific from Southern African to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Widely distributed, but patchy populations.

Habitat

  • Found in tropical shallow waters, inshore on sandy substrates commonly at depths below 164 feet (50 m), with a maximum recorded range at 328 feet (100 m).

Reproduction & Growth

  • Ovoviparous. Eggs develop inside mother’s body and hatch inside. Animals are then born live.

Conservation Status

  • “Least Concern” on the IUCN Red List.
  • Southeast Asian population listed as “Vulnerable” due to fishing pressures for valuable skin.

Additional Information

  • Other common names include “Jenkins Whipray,” “Brown Stingray,” and “Sharpnose Stingray.”
  • Skin is highly valuable due to large thorns on tail.
  • Caught with demersal tangle nets, bottom trawl and longline fisheries for its meat, cartilage and skin.
  • T.E.D.s and other exclusion devices have greatly reduced bycatch of this species.

Sources

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